ARMN Ozone Bio-indicator Garden: Report From the 2022 Growing Season

by Leslie Cameron The ozone bio-indicator garden at the Walter Reed Community Center (WRCC) is concluding its second full growing season. Arlington Regional Master Naturalists installed the garden in 2020 and are collecting data on the impact of tropospheric or ground level-ozone air pollution on plants, in cooperation with NASA, the Harvard Smithsonian Center forContinue reading “ARMN Ozone Bio-indicator Garden: Report From the 2022 Growing Season”

ARMN Summer Chapter Meeting Highlights the Four Mile Run Conservancy Foundation and Mini Bioblitz

Text and photos by Rod Mackler, unless otherwise noted. ARMN held its summer chapter meeting in Alexandria’s Four Mile Run Park.  The “Arlington Region” for the Arlington Regional Master Naturalists includes Alexandria, Falls Church City, and parts of Fairfax County, as well as Arlington County.  It was a glorious day, with temperatures in the 70sContinue reading “ARMN Summer Chapter Meeting Highlights the Four Mile Run Conservancy Foundation and Mini Bioblitz”

Impact of White-Tailed Deer on Arlington’s Forests

by Leslie Cameron and Bill Browning In mid-November, ARMN members Bill Browning, Jeff Elder, Steve Young, and Leslie Cameron met with Arlington Parks and Recreation Conservation and Interpretation Manager Rachael Tolman to evaluate a deer “exclosure” in Gulf Branch Park.  The deer exclosure was built in 2017 as part of an Eagle Scout project forContinue reading “Impact of White-Tailed Deer on Arlington’s Forests”

ARMN Ozone Garden Work Continues at Walter Reed Community Center

by Barbara Hoffheins, Todd Minners, Terri McPalmer, and Jon Bell In 2020, Arlington Regional Master Naturalist (ARMN) volunteers initiated the Ozone Garden with the cooperation and support of Arlington County Parks at Walter Reed Community Center (WRCC) located at 2909 16th St S, Arlington, VA 22204. (The beginnings of this project were reported in anContinue reading “ARMN Ozone Garden Work Continues at Walter Reed Community Center”

Two Honors! Glenn Tobin Earned the 2020 Bill Thomas Volunteer Award, and ARMN is presented the Virginia Chapter of the Wildlife Society’s 2021 A. Willis Robertson Award

Glenn Tobin is the 2020 Bill Thomas Park Volunteer Award Winner On April 20, 2021, Glenn Tobin received Arlington County’s Bill Thomas Park Volunteer Award for the year 2020. The award recognizes an individual or group whose efforts show ongoing dedication and tangible benefit to Arlington’s natural resources, parks, and public open spaces. Glenn hasContinue reading “Two Honors! Glenn Tobin Earned the 2020 Bill Thomas Volunteer Award, and ARMN is presented the Virginia Chapter of the Wildlife Society’s 2021 A. Willis Robertson Award”

Yellow-rumps: A Bird Watcher’s Delight in the Winter, Spring, and Fall

Text and photos by Ginger Hays (except as noted) Yellow-rumped warblers ((Setophaga coronate) are a very abundant species of the Wood Warbler family—those small, often brightly colored birds that bird watchers go crazy about during spring and fall migration. Bird watchers affectionately call them “butter butts.” There are two primary subspecies of yellow-rumped warblers: the Myrtle warbler,Continue reading “Yellow-rumps: A Bird Watcher’s Delight in the Winter, Spring, and Fall”

Birds of A Feather: The Making of a Video on How to Identify Local Birds

by Joan Haffey (ARMN), with input from Charlie Haffey (helpful brother) When the Covid-19 pandemic struck, the programming coordinator for a senior services center near me asked if I would do some “Bird Zooms” for isolated seniors. Their clients are often locked down in their apartments or worse, in their room, with few, if any,Continue reading “Birds of A Feather: The Making of a Video on How to Identify Local Birds”

Flying Squirrels—They’re Still Here!

by Kasha Helget A couple of years ago, I shared a story about a wonderful program that Long Branch Nature Center runs each year about our local flying squirrel population. Among other things, we learned that these are southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans), 8-10 inches long (including their tails), and weighing on average a coupleContinue reading “Flying Squirrels—They’re Still Here!”

ARMN: Getting to Know Paul Gibson

by Alison Sheahan Paul Gibson has been a stalwart volunteer ever since joining the ARMN program in Spring 2013, especially in the areas of citizen science. I was able to interview him online and then finally got to meet him at the ARMN Annual Chapter meeting in December 2019. Here are some fascinating things IContinue reading “ARMN: Getting to Know Paul Gibson”

Outstanding Participation in the 2019 City Nature Challenge! What Are the Next Steps?

by Louis Harrell Citizen science activities are an important way for individuals to contribute to scientific knowledge and for members of the public to increase their knowledge of local natural resources. Currently, the largest citizen science project that ARMN supports is the City Nature Challenge. Read about the results of this year’s challenge and theContinue reading “Outstanding Participation in the 2019 City Nature Challenge! What Are the Next Steps?”